Oceanic Whitetip Shark Fishing Banned

As part of the last meeting of the Convention on International Trade of Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), held this week in Bangkok (Thailand), the national government banned fishing for oceanic whitetip shark (Carcharhinus longimanus) in Brazilian waters. The decision was made in order to preserve this endangered species.

See on www.fis.com

Oceanic Whitetip 3

Advertisements

Dead or Alive: The Promise of Tourism For Shark Conservation

Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos

One strategy to help protect and research sharks is ecotourism. A recent study around Costa Rica’s Cocos Island, estimated the value of a Hammerhead shark at US $1.6 million each for tourism purposes, compared to less than $200 it could sell for. A 2011 study by the Australian Institute of Marine Science had an even bigger difference, estimating a lifetime value of nearly US $2 million dollars for a Reef shark in Palau vs. only $108 for it’s sale in a fish market. Governments are starting to take notice of this economic value; countries including Australia, Palau, as well as the Cook Islands have recently created large marine areas to protect sharks and other ocean life.

See on www.travelculturemag.com

English: Grey reef shark (Carcharhinus amblyrh...

CITES Makes Historic Decision to Protect Sharks and Rays

CITES victory for sharks and rays bannerCITES plenary today accepted Committee recommendations to list five species of highly traded sharks under the CITES Appendices, along with those for the listing of both manta rays and one species of sawfish.

We’re grateful to proponent governments for recognizing the value of thriving shark and ray populations, and for championing sound proposals,” said Ania Budziak, Project AWARE’s Associate Director. “We’re proud that the divers’ voice has contributed to achieving this key milestone in shark and ray conservation.”

See on www.sciencedaily.com

English: Manta Ray off Ishigaki Island in Sept...

CITES 2013: Take Action for Sharks and Rays

Reef shark and diverIn just a few weeks the fate of vulnerable shark and ray species including the beloved Manta Ray and Hammerhead Shark will be decided by CITES authorities. The 16th meeting of  the Conference of the Parties (CITES CoP16) to be held in Bangkok, Thailand from 3 to 14 March 2013 offers an unique opportunity to secure trade protection for the most vulnerable species. We can’t let these magnificent creatures disappear on our watch. CITES delegates need to hear loud and clear that we want them to vote YES for sharks and rays. Extinction is NOT an Option. Take Action!

3 Easy Ways to Voice Your Support for Shark Conservation at CITES 2013:

  1. Sign the Petition – Join more than 120,000 concerned citizens who are urging decision makers to protect sharks. Sign the petition and ask your friends, family and colleagues to do the same.
  2. Send a Letter to CITES Leaders – All you need to do is fill in the form and hit the send button. The letter asking CITES delegates to vote YES for sharks and rays will go direct to those who could make all the difference in just one click.
  3. Spread the word that Extinction is NOT an Option:
    Download the sign and contribute a photo to Project AWARE‘s CITES 2013 photo album
    – Add the #CITES4SHARKS  Twibbon to your Facebook or Twitter profile picture.

#CITES4SHARKS Twibbon

Whether you like sharks or not, saving them from becoming extinct is vital. The loss of sharks threatens the stability of the marine environment, and also threatens the socio-economically important recreational fisheries.

Sharks have been waiting a long time to get the protection that many terrestrial animals have received from CITES.  They can’t wait any longer. Populations of several shark species have been decimated by over 95% and experts estimate that most of them will be lost within a decade if we don’t take urgent conservation measures to protect them from over-exploitation, including targeted fishing, bycatch and finning.

With your petition signatures in their hands, the Project AWARE team who has been campaign for better shark protection for years is ready to represent your voice and demand that sharks and rays receive trade protections they desperately need but they need your support. The time to protect sharks and rays is NOW!

image008 (1)

The Countdown to Secure Trade Protection for Sharks Starts NOW

Did you know? Only three shark species are protected under CITES regulations (great white, whale shark and basking shark). Yet many shark species such as scalloped hammerhead, porbeagle and spiny dogfish are on the brink of extinction!

In less than one year’s time, Government officials from all around the world will meet in Thailand to discuss the fate of the most threatened and heavily traded shark species. With 175 member countries the Convention on International Trade of Endangered Species (CITES) sets controls on the international trade and movement of animals and plants at risks of becoming extinct.

Many shark populations have declined dramatically over the past thirty years, some by as much as 99%. By supporting the Big Shark Shout Out campaign and signing the CITES petition you can give sharks a fighting chance and ensure the most vulnerable shark species get the trade protection they desperately need.

Sign the CITES petition TODAY

SHARK FINNING

The burgeoning and largely unregulated trade in shark fins represents one of the most serious threats to shark populations worldwide.

Shark finning (the cruel practice which involves slicing fins from sharks at sea and dumping their bodies overboard) is not only an Asian problem. Shark fin soup can be found in many restaurants across the world and many countries export shark fins to the Asian market.

According to some studies, every country with a coastline export fins to Hong Kong. Despite a shark finning ban implemented in 2003 in Europe for instance, EU countries (particularly Spain) continue to be the single largest supplier of shark fins to the Hong Kong market.

WHY SHARKS ARE IMPORTANT

Sharks play an important role in keeping the ocean healthy and in balance. They regulate the quantity and health of other species of fish and invertebrates. Sharks quite often prey on sick, diseased or old animals. This prevents the disease or sickness from spreading and  creates habitat space for other animals. Oceans without sharks are oceans out of balance, which means trouble for everyone who depends on oceans for food, jobs and enjoyment. All of us really!

Support for shark protection is difficult to achieve because of the persistent irrational fear of sharks. A change in attitude, perception, media coverage, and improved conservation legislation and fishing policies are desperately needed. Public support for shark conservation is crucial to balance short-term interests and ensure that strong and enforceable shark conservation measures are implemented.

We can’t afford to ignore the fate of sharks because some of us are afraid of these animals or because this slaughter happens miles out at sea where no one sees it. The results of the loss of sharks will have effects beyond our  imagination and beyond our current ability to understand.

%d bloggers like this: